How Long Does Nicotine Stay In Your Blood

Quick answer:
 

Calculate The Duration Time For Nicotine To Stay in Your Blood From Last Use:

(select your level of use below)

Light Occasional User
Regular User
Heavy User




Duration
in Blood


Note: Please use the above figures as only a guide. The length of time may change according to the strength of nicotine you take, if you have any medical conditions, your own rate of metabolism, and the particular nicotine test used. To speed up your metabolism and get these times down even quicker, you may want to try a detox program, to lean more click here!

 

How Long Does Nicotine Stay In Your Blood?
Long Answer:

How long does Nicotine stay in blood is an important question that must be answered before finding the answer to the question when you can completely quit smoking. Nicotine comes to your body through a variety of ways in the present days though the primary source of nicotine is through smoking of tobacco products like cigars and cigarettes. Nicotine is an alkaloid substance that has an adverse effect on the nervous system of human beings and is highly addictive in nature.



Due to this you must know exactly how long does nicotine stay in your blood before you can completely stop using tobacco and other materials that push nicotine into ones’ body. When you suddenly stop its usage you will be afflicted with the withdrawal symptoms and hence you must know how to cleanse your body and detoxify it before you can escape from the bad effects of nicotine in your blood.

The time for which nicotine stays in your blood varies from person to person. This mostly depends on the type of use of tobacco or other products that are known sources of nicotine. This also depends on how much you have been using them and how long you are using them.  All these determine the total quantity of how long does nicotine stay in your blood and this in turn determines how and what type of action you have to take to eliminate the accumulated nicotine from your blood.

As tobacco happens to be the primary source of Nicotine, the time for which nicotine stays in blood depends on the type of use like chewing, smoking for snuffing etc. The detection of nicotine in your blood can be done by a blood test, and the quantity of nicotine that can be found in your blood depends on whether you are a smoking addict or just a casual, social smoker. When you have been smoking and made it a habit for over last six months then small amounts of nicotine can be seen in your blood even after twenty days after you have stopped using tobacco. Depending on the type and character of use of tobacco the presence of nicotine in your blood can be found easily.

In case of a light user who has smoked occasionally, only very minute amount of nicotine can be found after 2 to 4 days and due to this, the longer the time between the stopping of usage and the time of test the smaller will be the amount of nicotine stays in blood. On the other hand if you are a medium user and smoke irregularly once or twice in a week, the amount of nicotine that can be found will be slightly higher than in case of a light user. But in the case of a person who is heavily addicted to the use of nicotine giving materials then the time for which nicotine stay in your blood will be more than 15 days after the last use of the nicotine source.

When you become aware of the bad effects of nicotine on your body you may want to come out of the smoking habit, and for this you need to completely send out its traces in your body. There are times when you may want to come out of nicotine to pass a tobacco blood test by your employer or your insurance company. You can flush out the amount of nicotine present in your body by detoxification treatments as well as making suitable changes to your diet.

By taking more of citrus fruits you can supply your body with the required amounts of Vitamin C that helps in absorption of nicotine by natural metabolism of the body. In addition to this, also do some vigorous workouts and the sweat that comes out of your body will take away and dissolve the nicotine present in your body and send out all the nicotine stay in your blood.

So, be aware of the fact that it matters much to know about how long does nicotine stay in your blood and then only it will be possible for any treatment to quit smoking or give-up nicotine products and help get out of this addiction at an early date.

 

How long does Tobacco stay in your Blood?

Quit Nicotine Smoking in 7 Days!When you use tobacco by chewing, snuffing or smoking, the potentially dangerous alkaloid substance enters your body, which affects your nervous system, and can be very harmful to your body.  You must be aware that the time required to completely come out of smoking depends on how long does tobacco stay in your blood. If you are light smoker then tobacco chemicals stay in your blood for three days after you have smoked your last cigar, while it will be ten days if you have smoked heavily and become addicted to large doses of nicotine.  This can be easily detected by conducting a tobacco blood test. Till your blood has traces of tobacco chemicals you cannot stop smoking as your cravings for nicotine and its withdrawal effects will make you feel sicker at the starting of the treatment to quit smoking. So it may be a good idea to use nicotine patches, nicotine gum or e-cigarettes, then gradually lower the nicotine dose.

The detection of tobacco in the blood depends on whether you are a social smoker or an addict. If you are a regular user of tobacco for over the last 6 months, then the remnants can be detected within your system for around 20 days or longer. Dependent on usage, there are different ranks that will help outline the existence of tobacco chemicals in your body.

How Long Does Tobacco Stay In Your Blood For a Light Smoker:

chemicals are detectable for 2 to 3 days after last use.

How Long Does Tobacco Stay In Your Blood For a Heavy Smoker:

chemicals are detectable for over 10 days after last use.

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